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The Rule of St. Benedict I
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On Monastic Obedience and the Role of the Abbot.
Description
Type
Book
Source
Sasau scribe
Weight
Kg
Price
50 Groschen

The Rule of St. Benedict I is one of the books in Kingdom Come: Deliverance.

Contents

Silence
Let us act in accordance with that saying of the Prophet; "I have said: I will keep my ways, that I offend not with my tongue. I have been watchful over my mouth: I held my peace and humbled myself, and was silent from speaking even good things. If, therefore, according to this saying of the Prophet we are at times to abstain, for silence sake, even from good talk, how much more ought we to refrain from evil words, on account of the guilt and penalty of sin! Therefore, because of the importance of silence, let leave to speak be seldom given, even to perfect disciples although their words be of good and holy matters, tending unto edification; because it is written: “In much speaking, thou shalt not escape sin." And in another place: " Death and life are in the hands of the tongue." For it behoveth a master to speak and teach; and it beseemeth a disciple to hold his peace and listen. If, therefore, anything must be asked of the Prior, let it be done with all humility, subjection, and reverence, that he who asks may not seem to speak more than is necessary. But as for buffoonery, idle words, or such as move to laughter, we utterly condemn and forbid them in all places, nor do we allow a disciple to open his mouth to give them utterance.
On Daily Manual Labour
Idleness is an enemy of the soul. Therefore, the Brethren ought to be employed at certain times in labouring with their hands, and at other fixed times, in holy reading. Wherefore we think that both these occasions may be well ordered thus: From Easter till the first of October, let them, on going forth from Prime, labour at whatever they are required till about the fourth hour. From the fourth, till close upon the sixth hour, let them be employed in reading. On rising from table after the sixth hour, let them rest on their beds with all silence, or if perchance any one shall desire to read, let him read in such a way as not to disturb anyone else. Let None be said seasonably, at about the middle of the eighth hour, and after that let them work at what they have to do till the evening. If the situation of the place, or their poverty require them to labour in reaping their corn, let them not be saddened thereat, for then are they Monks in very deed, when they live by the labour of their hands, as our Fathers and the Apostles did before us. Yet let all things be done with moderation for the sake of the fainthearted.

See also


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